Friday Mosque Herat, Afghanistan

Star City, Russia Russian Orthodox Church (recently built)

Church of St Elizabeth Bratislava,  Slovakia

Herat was for centuries part of Greater Iran, and residents of the city and environs still speak Farsi.

Star City in Russia was built in the mid-2oth century and was/is the NASA equivalent under the Soviets and continues today.

Museo Diego Rivera Anahuacalli Coyoacán, Mexico

Originally designed by Diego Rivera to house his collection of pre-contact Mexican art. The designs were completed by his daughter Ruth, along with the architects Juan O’Gorman, andHereberto Pegelson. Note the use of corbel arch in the bottom pic. This type of vaulting was popular and widely used in Mesoamerica. Also barely visible on the exterior walls is a Modernist interpretation of the Quetzalcoatl reliefs found originally in Teotihuacan. Also noticeable in the 2 bottom pics are pre-contact sculptures displayed outside. I am not sure if these are original or copies. I am hoping they are copies, and not original works of pre-Columbian art  exposed to the elements, looting, and vandalism. 

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Anahuacalli Museo Diego Rivera, Coyoacan, Mexico City, Mexico

Juan O’Gorman, Hereberto Pegelson, and Ruth Rivera

Designed by Diego Rivera to house his own collection of over 50,000 ancient Mexican artifacts. Influenced by Teotihuacan and Mayan architecture, the building was photographed by Josef Albers (bottom).

http://www.museoanahuacalli.org.mx/

I love how Rivera referenced Mayan architects use and love for the corbel vault in this building.

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superbestiario:

Mary Smith earned sixpence a week shooting dried peas at sleeping workers windows.
A Knocker-up (sometimes known as a knocker-upper) was a profession in England and Ireland that started during and lasted well into the Industrial Revolution and at least as late as the 1920s, before alarm clocks were affordable or reliable. A knocker-up’s job was to rouse sleeping people so they could get to work on time.
The knocker-up used a truncheon or short, heavy stick to knock on the clients’ doors or a long and light stick, often made of bamboo, to reach windows on higher floors. Some of them used pea-shooters. In return, the knocker-up would be paid a few pence a week. The knocker-up would not leave a client’s window until sure that the client had been awoken.
There were large numbers of people carrying out the job, especially in larger industrial towns such as Manchester. Generally the job was carried out by elderly men and women but sometimes police constables supplemented their pay by performing the task during early morning patrols.
Photograph from Philip Davies’ Lost London: 1870 - 1945.

superbestiario:

Mary Smith earned sixpence a week shooting dried peas at sleeping workers windows.

A Knocker-up (sometimes known as a knocker-upper) was a profession in England and Ireland that started during and lasted well into the Industrial Revolution and at least as late as the 1920s, before alarm clocks were affordable or reliable. A knocker-up’s job was to rouse sleeping people so they could get to work on time.

The knocker-up used a truncheon or short, heavy stick to knock on the clients’ doors or a long and light stick, often made of bamboo, to reach windows on higher floors. Some of them used pea-shooters. In return, the knocker-up would be paid a few pence a week. The knocker-up would not leave a client’s window until sure that the client had been awoken.

There were large numbers of people carrying out the job, especially in larger industrial towns such as Manchester. Generally the job was carried out by elderly men and women but sometimes police constables supplemented their pay by performing the task during early morning patrols.

Photograph from Philip Davies’ Lost London: 1870 - 1945.